Semi-nerdy post ahead. You've been warned.

So, it’s a month in. I won’t make a habit of talking about my numbers. I don’t post them up for comparison purposes, but just for the record, because I like data. *fiddles with glasses*

The book has been out for about a month now. A little over a month. It is up on Smashwords, Amazon, B&N. It got approved for premium service, so I’ve seen it on iTunes and Diesel Books. It has yet to show up on Kobo. (More on that in a minute.)

So far, across the board, the reported amount I’ve made is a bit over $30. I know, breaking the bank! But I’m an unknown. I’ve had about 6 sales on Amazon US, plus two more this week. On Amazon UK, I’ve had three all together.

Smashwords has my biggest amount of downloads. I put it for sale on the 11th and made a coupon to get it for free for two weeks. By the 13th, I’d had 400 page views and 170 downloads! Three were purchased. As of now, I think I’ve had six purchases? I’ve also been approved for premium distribution.

On Diesel Books, Ruin made some lists. It’s a top seller in the sci-fi> general and other category. I figured that in a sub-category the amount of books would be smaller, so no big deal to make a bestseller list. What did surprise me was the book climbing their bestseller list for science fiction eBooks. As of today, it’s number 5 (it was number 7 at the time I wrote this a couple days ago and had been slipping down to number 8). Yikes! I hope people are liking it since it is not what I would consider pure science fiction.

Just how well am I doing on Diesel Books considering the listing? I have no clue. With Smashwords, the extra distributers report every few weeks. It could just be that I’m selling a book every few days and that’s what’s bumping me up. I will say, though, that the big difference I see between Diesel eBooks and other sites is that they do recommendations based on genre, not on purchasing history. That’s sort of a big difference between them and Amazon, and for that I’m grateful. Even if it turns out I have something like three sales from them when they do report. I think it’s still a great system that gives more chances to unknowns like me.

Now, on Kobo, there are some things that have made me think about this a little. I love Kobo because I have a Kobo. I’m biased. But a recent entry from Catheryn Ryan Howard (Why is my Book is Still 99c?) has made me think about it in a different light. Not a negative light, just different. If you want to do temporary sales by changing the prices of your books, and you have your book in the Kobo store, then you’ll have some things to consider.

It takes a long time to get into the Kobo store. It also takes a while for changes to occur through the Kobo store. So if you temporarily price a book at 99c, this could lead to problems when it comes time to bring the price back up.

A better solution for sales is probably just to use coupons from Smashwords. Word about these coupons gets out quickly! Those first few days, I made all sorts of lists because the book was free. People spread the word about the coupon. I know a lot of people say they have few sales on Smashwords, but I think Smashwords is one of those sites where you get what you put into it. Personally, I do like the control it gives me over my books and pricing with coupons where I can set how much they are and how long they’re valid. Plus I can modify existing coupons just in case something goes wrong.

I sort of wish Amazon let us make our own coupons.

Anyway, that’s the report for right now.

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