Tag Archives: Self Publishing

The poor quality of many self-published books comes up with some regularity. The most discussion has been started by Chuck Wendig who makes a point that self-publishing isn’t “amateur hour.” You should always put your best foot forward when you’re making a thing you’re going to charge money for.

Interestingly, a lot of people are either attacking him (I’ve read comments calling him a bad writer) or outright dismissing him (because he’s such a “bad writer”). People do seem to get defensive when self-publishing is called out for poor quality works. And it isn’t because they’re arguing that self-publishing books aren’t bad, more like they’re arguing for being “bad” because readers will suss out what’s bad and what is good which will then, hopefully, teach an author what doesn’t work and what does. Their next book will be better, and the book after that will be better.

Some thoughts I always have:

The people often talked about are not reading these discussions. There are plenty of people who write crap or have written crap and just throw it up online because why the hell not? Some people hope to make a little money. Some think they are honestly good and won’t hear talk that they aren’t. The people who don’t give a shit exist. But see, they don’t give a shit, so do you think they’re going to care about the call to stop publishing crap? (No. The answer is no.)

The beauty of self-publishing is that it’s open and anyone can do it. This is also the ugly side. I always say that our greatest strength are often our greatest weaknesses. The same goes for self-publishing. I can post whatever I want for whatever reasons I want. But so can the previously mentioned non-shit giving author.

Readers are not “gatekeepers.” They are customers. And customers make decisions. They can download samples of stories that sound interesting, and they can read it before purchasing. If they are not aware of this, then I don’t know what to think because the preview button is right next to the purchase button. Amazon also gives you seven days to get your money back, so if you pick up a book with a good preview that falls apart after you’ve read it, you can get money back. (At least you could last year. I feel like I’ve been gone forever. You can still do that, right?)

There are shitty publishing house books too. Sometimes a shit book is a shit book. It happens. I don’t think I’ve ever really read a crappy book– because, you know, previews– but I’ve read some books where I got to the end and I just said, “What the crap?”

These discussion are going to continue of course. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with it, but I’m going to keep on not caring what my neighbor is doing (unless they’re my friend and they’ve asked for my opinion). I don’t really believe it matters. Readers will find what they like, they’ll call out what they don’t like. If they swear off self-published books because of one book they read that was really terrible, well then, they are probably not your audience. There are plenty of other readers to go around, just like there are now plenty of writers.

I suck at marketing: I’d like to tell anyone happening across this blog who might be curious about how terrible or not terrible I am that I’ve placed Ruin free on Smashwords. Okay, not exactly free. It’s set to, pay what you want which means you can get it without paying anything or you can use it as a chance to tip an author. 🙂


At some point, I became afraid of failing. Is this due to age? I don’t remember being so worried when I was younger. I didn’t like getting low grades on tests and essays, but I’d look at it as a chance to learn. I’d read over every correction and figure out where I went wrong.

Where did that person go? I feel like I’ve been avoiding writing at all because I’m afraid of it being crap. I already know that not everything is going to be a gem. That doesn’t stop me from seizing up and becoming super exhausted at the prospect of starting completely over with a new story.

I needed to do something to shake things up. And so I accepted a challenge to write and publish a story within 8 hours issued by J.A. Konrath. I found out about it on Monday, and

 the “deadline” technically was Thursday. I didn’t really start until Tuesday.

But I did it. I am terrified.

My current process for writing things for release: More than a few drafts, polished as much as I think I can on my own because I don’t want to waste the time of my readers. I hand it off to a close friend for content editing. I take it back, make more changes, hand it off to another friend for content and grammar. Get it back, make more changes. Give it to another friend who is an avid reader, and a really great copy editor. Get it back, make a bunch of fixes. And then finally, I hand off a printed copy to my boyfriend and have him go over it in the picky way he does. Get it back, make more corrections. (there are always more to be made!) By the first time I’ve sent a story out, I’m sick of it.

The challenge was to write a short in 8 hours, including doing the cover on your own, the blurb on your own, and the editing on your own. I spent about six hours on the story, one hour on the cover (pitiful), half an hour on the blurb (I did get a second opinion on that blurb over lunch). And then some extra time to print it out and self-edit. I am sure I was over the 8 hour mark, but only if I count all the time I spent staring off into space while sitting in front of my computer. And I’m not.

Image

I present my short, The Hungry:

Twenty years ago, the world ended and no one will discuss it.

Rebecca, a denizen of one of the protected cities, volunteers to join the courier service in order to see out what is beyond her city’s fence with her own eyes. Is she prepared for what she will find?

Aside from one passage where I was concerned about if the action would be clear, I didn’t share any of it with my friends. I just wrote it and put it out there. I’m surprised at my own audacity. I shouldn’t think that I can do this– write something fast and put it for sale.

But I did.

The story came in at about 8,000 words. It’s marked for .99 and is only available on the Kindle. Saturday and Sunday it can be downloaded for free. Come see how badly I have screwed things up!


That’s it. I needed to say it out loud. Though I do get a thrill when someone buys my book (c’mon, I’m still a human writer), I didn’t really publish it for the money. Any money I have made on it goes back into the book to cover the costs of artwork. That’s pretty much it. I’m not about to make a living selling books. I’ve always known that. Still, I often beat myself up because I don’t write fast enough. Instead of encouraging me to write, it only makes me want to give up. Except that it’s impossible to stop writing. So it’s a circle that will continue, leaving me feeling like crap.

This is a new level of doubt, brought on by our modern age. There are so many books and stories out there right now that I think we all fear getting lost. If you don’t put out so many books a year, then you’re supposedly screwed.

Maybe I am. So maybe I’m fooling myself here, but I think that if people read your story and really enjoy it, they will always find a way to stay in touch. This is also the way I approach my friends. Instead of being surrounded by a lot of people I have to constantly keep in contact with, I surround myself with a few choice friends that I can call up any time, no matter how much time has passed, and have it be as if we never left off. (This might be part of why I don’t get very far on Twitter.)

My last book was published in 2011. I’d intended to have another book by summer. Ha! I look back on my hopeful self and sort of laugh. (It might still be too soon. Maybe I can fully laugh next year. Hopefully I have another book out by then.)

So here’s what it comes down to: Do I want to race a story out because I’m afraid of being forgotten? Or do I want to write a story that will strike a cord and ensure that I’m remembered? Even if only for that one story. How long will it take for that second option? I don’t know yet. I’ll tell you when I finish something good.


It’s been one year since I published my first book. I have definitely formed some opinions about my experience that won’t necessarily be transferable to anyone else’s possible experiences. But here they are, my thoughts on self-publishing.

1. It’s slow going. Sales have never been astounding, but they’re going. I earn about $20 per month without doing much of anything. It does taper off after a while. The past two months, I’ve had no sales on Amazon and that was the strongest seller. Which brings me to the next thought:

2. It’s a good idea to have books waiting to be published, especially if you’re writing a series. A lot of people suggest using the momentum from one book to push out another and to keep doing that. It’s good advice when you’re writing a series and you want to make some money at it. The idea is that with all the books out there, it’s easy to be forgotten if it takes too long from one book to the next. I’ll admit that I’m not sure about that, yet, as I haven’t put out a proper second book.

3. I’m glad that I did not wait to publish. Yes, this is personal. I lost my big sister, the one who always tried to think of ways I could make what I loved doing viable. “Write children’s books,” she’d say while I shrugged. When I finally published, and she saw my book, she asked for a copy and showed it off at her work telling them it was what I’d always wanted to do. I would not have traded in that experience for anything even though my book is out there on its lonesome. It’s making friends and meeting people. People who’ve enjoyed the book keep in touch by liking the Facebook page or submitting their email to the newsletter which I’ll send out only when there is a new release.

4. I’m not so sure about “social networking.” I still like Twitter, but I really only connect with a few people. So many writers use it to push their books (not just talking self-published either!), that it becomes meaningless. I like to see people on Twitter who are chatting, not necessarily about their puppies, but about games, writing, thoughts, opinions. I don’t mind when those people retweet something or share the occasional book link. I will also say that I think Twitter benefits some people more than others. Some people can be engaging with few words. They send out clever and funny tweets that brighten days, they manage to be all over the place in the small amount of time they’re on. I’m not like that. It takes a while to get to know me, and I need longer than 140 characters, so I’ve noticed that the people I best connect with are ones who have blogs I comment on.

Overall, I’m pleased with my decision to self-publish. This is exactly what I’ve always wanted to do, though I’ll admit I’ve got more than I bargained for with the picking out cover artists and designing my own books. But even that isn’t super difficult if you don’t want it to be. I went this route because I can do things on my own time in my own way. Just having the book out there means I’ve completed my mission successfully. Onto the next one!


Last month, I sort of went through a writing block. It was tough to move forward even though I knew exactly what I needed to do. Somehow, I still managed to write every day. Unfortunately, I knew the words weren’t great and it was one of those things where I’d write stuff down to try and get unstuck then come around and rewrite the scenes again. (I’m not sure how many times I did that per scene.) And that’s for a short story that was only 10,000 words! It just wasn’t my month.

Eventually, I finished a second draft which I revisited today after letting it rest for two weeks. It’s not as bad as I thought. It falls apart in the second third, so I have to rewrite some more, haha.

While I was letting the previously mentioned story sit, I started play writing on another idea I had for a story. I was really excited to dive into it. Until the other day when I managed to corrupt the file through what I’m going to think of as a comedy of errors but was really my fault for not unmounting the USB drive properly when I used it on the tablet. Oops. Now, normally, if I lose a lot of words on a story (it was at 11,000 words on that last night), I end up pretty miserable. This time that wasn’t the case! Losing all those words actually made me a little excited because I could start fresh and make an outline using what I’d discovered in the play writing.

I was a little disappointed though. There were some things I didn’t want to rewrite 100%. And today, I managed to find the text file that CHKDSK put the remnants of the file into! So I now have the outline and I have the original text. I’m still going to be doing a whole rewrite, but I feel better about knowing the old text is still somewhere.

 

So, I’m not one for self-promotion. I’m actually really bad at it, and I’ve decided to accept that. I don’t really market, and I try not to spam my twitter because I can’t stand when other authors do nothing but tweet about their book. BUT I do have some stuff to share.

First thing is that Ruin is free this weekend in order to support a pretty smart book review site. It’s called the Intergalactic Academy, and they review young adult science fiction novels. They just reviewed Ruin today. The giveaway code is at the bottom of the review. It’s good until tomorrow!

Also, read an ebook week starts tomorrow as well. Ruin is still going to be free of course to support the Intergalactic Academy, but starting on the fifth, it will be half off all week on Smashwords (making it only $2) and the Two Brothers, a companion novella, is name your own price, so that means it can be downloaded for free with no obligation to pay. There are going to be a lot of other books on sale and free, so keep an eye out!

Authors, if you have books going on sale on Smashwords, visit the This post on the Self-Published Author Lounge to put your book in a listing. Readers, you should also keep an eye out on the Self-Published Author’s Lounge as they’ll start listing books on sale on Smashwords. You might find something good to read.


Yesterday, a good friend of mine made a post about her decision to self-publish. It’s beautiful, a funny and honest look at one writer’s thought processes.

As I read it, I thought, “YES.” (In caps like that too.) I’m sitting here with my cat in my arms and cackling silently to myself because I don’t want to disturb the cat, so I probably do look a lot like a villain, making plots and twisting writer’s thoughts.

Here’s the thing, my master plan. This has been my dream for the longest time. It’s even why I went to school to become a teacher before I realized that being a teacher wasn’t really for me.

What I most want is for writers to see their own worth.

Writing is not an exclusive club. If you write, you’re a writer. It is honestly that simple. It gets more complicated when we talk about good or bad writing, but that’s not what this post is about.

This post is just about you, my writing friends. Your voice is unique. There is no one else who can tell a story like you can. In fact, inside you there are probably stories that will only occur to you and no one else. If you don’t write it, no one else will.

Artists everywhere are prone to angst. We all know this. We remind ourselves of this as we work on projects, when we feel down, like we’re not quite good enough. But among the arts, I believe the writer is the most troubled.

Everyone speaks in words and everyone tells stories. Because of that, writing stories is looked down on as one of the most pedestrian of trades. This seems to create an inherent need for us to prove ourselves to the world at large. I think this is where the rules and the comparisons come in. Writers absolutely feel a need to be able to point to something that proves their worth or they think they’re just some kid pretending.

It’s understandable, but I think, over time, we’ve taken it too far. Now people are starting to believe they’re not real writers unless they’re published or they make money from it. Strange terms like “aspiring” make their way into conversations because writers no longer want to confess they’re writers because they fear the scoffing.

Well, stop it. If you are a writer, you will know you’re a writer. If you’re a writer, you’ll want to write even when you’re told you shouldn’t. You’ll write, even when you feel horrible about your writing. You’ll write because you want to be better, because there’s a story inside you begging to be told. You’ll know you’re a writer because you’ll feel it.

You can deny it all you want, but there’s no escape. If this sounds like a curse, I don’t mean it to, but it probably is. You’ll write one story, and you’ll love it. But shortly there after you’ll think, “I can do better.” And you will. Because you’re a writer, it’s what you do, and when you’re doing what you’re meant to, you can’t help yourself. Whatever path you take, take solace in the fact that you’ve found something that means so much to you it makes your heart race and it makes you flinch. This is one awesome and terrifying ride, but I’d rather be doing this than just about anything else.


I love Smashwords. So it sort of pains me when I see authors ask, “Should I put my book on Smashwords? What do you think?”

No, new author, what do you think? Do you only want to sell to Kindles? Do you realize that Kindles don’t read epub? That it’s a proprietary format? That those books can only and forever be on Kindles and Kindle products and programs?

An author can choose to go that route if they want, but I would hope that they have reasons for doing so other than, “Someone once told me…” or “People say…”

I’ll come out and say it, no, you probably won’t make much money from Smashwords. Yes, you do have to wait forever for their extra distributors to pay. And yes, Smashwords only pays you like once every six months. So why would I suggest going with Smashwords?

Freedom. I only buy indie books from Smashwords. You can download in any format (usually, unless the author has severely limited the formats the book will appear in). Generally I go for the epubs. Why? They’re DRM free, and that’s awesome. That means I can put it on any device. Why, I used to read books on my DS back in the day before I got a proper ereader. Plus, say I do decide to get a Kindle. I can download the book in the .mobi format needed for the Kindle.

I’ll admit that if a book isn’t on Smashwords, I skip it. There are a lot of good books put out by small publishers and self-publishers. I don’t need to work that hard to find a good book to spend my money on. Granted, I’m only one sale is a sea of sales, so that might not concern an author. There are plenty of authors who do great on Amazon.

So that’s freedom for me as a reader, but what about as an author? One of my favorite aspects of Smashwords is that the site allows for me to experiment. I can generate coupons, I can post things for free, and I can even use the “reader decides the price” option, which I will probably test out for the next story or something. I was tempted to try it out for this story, and may even do that later on.

Coupons are awesome because they cost me no money. It’s an easy way for me to mark a book down while still showing it’s value. And who doesn’t love a sale? (Well, except for in-store sales because those usually involve waiting in line.)

In the next year, I’m going to try pushing Smashwords a little more when I go out to sell the book. I’m planning on getting tables at the local anime conventions, and one of the things I’m hoping to do is have a QR code that points to the Smashwords site while handing out coupons. I really haven’t used Smashwords much because I haven’t really been marketing. These are just my thoughts on why I love the site.

Anyone else have thoughts? Hate Smashwords? Like Smashwords? Have a horrible experience with the site?


One of the assumptions I run across very often about self-publishing is that you do it on your own. That is SO not true. I will fully admit that I have done nothing on my own. My friends have been with me every step of the way. It’s difficult to list all of the things they have done for me since I decided to publish and the things they’ve done for me over the years by just being there, sharing their stories and playing a game with me. They’re like a support group for people who hear voices and have wacky ideas, and I’m very blessed to have them in my life.

Especially because if I didn’t, I don’t think this blurb would have gotten done and this cover wouldn’t look nearly as good!

I’d like to announce the next release, The Two Brothers, the first companion novella to Ruin.

Cover art by c.r. Favre.

Thirty years ago, there was a Revolution. Born in the aftermath, Jimmy was the first child from a human experiment to demonstrate unnatural abilities at a very young age. In the same incident that tore his family apart, he found his salvation and surrogate father in the tribe’s leader, Henri Smith.

Now Henri’s daughter from the Neutral Territory has arrived in the Southlands, stirring up memories of a girl Jimmy once worked to protect– memories tied to another child of Henri’s whose arrival precipitated an event that would define his adult life.

The Two Brothers is the second story released in the Ruin series, a web of interconnected stories where the lives of the people are as important as the world they live in.

This book will sell for 99 cents starting December 20th and will only be available as an ebook– for now.


My lab coat would have polka dots...

I gave it a try. There are plenty of people who vilify the .99 cent price point and others who praise it. Per my nerd girl directive, I wanted to test it out. Here were the questions I wanted answered and the answers I got:

How easy it is to do a sale by changing the price?

I had already hypothesized the answer to this one, and I was right. Not very. I don’t think that changing the price is a good way to go unless you’re going to leave it this way for a very long time. The issue is that it takes a while for distributers through Smashwords to update their prices. In the mean time, even though the prices have been raised elsewhere, like on Barnes and Nobel, Amazon will still be price matching the other distributers (but not Smashwords).

I think it is much better to offer coupons through Smashwords. (This is just my opinion.) For one, Smashwords lets you see stats like how many people visit your book page. This does sound a little obsessive, and I hate what I’m going to say next, but it is something I think about. You can sort of guess, using these stats, if some action of yours is having a direct effect. Are people looking? Are you reaching anyone? Are they downloading samples? This is stuff I do think about in the back of my mind, especially now while the numbers are low and I can easily compare spikes in the data to any effort on my part.

Does a low price for a very limited time lead to more sales?

I had a lot of people interested in the first giveaway, so I thought I would try to encourage any of those people I could with the sale. I made it a clear after giveaway sale, mentioned it on Goodreads, and put text mentioning the length of the sale in the book’s description and on the website.

I did get a few more sales than normal, and since it is still .99, I find I’m still getting sales. But I can’t be sure that’s because of the price point. Any number of things could have happened. In the end, my sales are actually too small to acurately get any data.

How did it make me feel?

Not good. While it was nice to see sometimes two books a day move, I still felt I was under valuing my own story. In my head, $2.99 is cheap. Unless you’re making $6 an hour, $3 is not even half an hour of work, and for $3, you get hours of entertainment. (With a dash of the writer’s blood and soul to boot, let’s not forget, so that has to be worth a few pennies.)

At $2.99, I’m getting close to $2 per ebook sold. Doesn’t that seem fair in a non-greedy sort of way for a newcomer? But at .99, I only get .35. That doesn’t look poor enough, let me type that out. I only get thirty-five cents.

(Oh man, if you all could see your faces. If I could only see your faces too.)

I know that there are authors who make a living off of .99 cent books. I’m not here to judge. Everyone has a different spot they’re comfortable at. It’s just that .99 is not for me unless I’ve purposefully written something out that is meant to be short and cheap– like the next story coming up. I’m going to sell it for .99 cents, not because I think it’s bad, but because I think that is a worthy price point for it. The story will be short and able to be read in a day, but that doesn’t mean that it won’t be a good one worthy of that dollar.

Final Conclusion

A limited time sale is awesome. I have picked up books I’ve loved at .99 and discovered some new authors that way. But I feel it is also important to note that if I’ve already discovered an author I know I like (as in one whose stuff I have read before and loved), a sale will actually discourage me from purchasing and I’ll wait until the book is back at its regular price.

So I guess I won’t ever say that I’ll never try this again. I have the next few releases in this series planned with other ideas emerging for future books and stories. Plus I have stuff in my head that has nothing to do with the series I’m working on now. Anything is possible. I’m all about experimenting.



So I’ve been in my cave fixing up the next story. It involves (as always) a lot of chocolate, some cheeseburgers, and plenty of rolling around and moping. Editing is a pain in the ass, but there’s no way around it. I’m going to have to read and re-read this short story until I’m absolutely sick of it. The hope being that I will get this thing closer to what it’s meant to be in comparison to the Beta version, which was just a structure made out of straw. (Appropriate considering that one blog post.)

As I’ve been working on the story, it occurred to me that there are stages to editing that seem to occur every time I start this entire process. So for your entertainment, I present to you my stages of editing.

Stage 1. Denial

*looks over suggested edits* “What? That? No, I can’t change that. That’s genius. They just didn’t understand that bit. I’ll fix it.”

Note: Be careful writing email responses in this stage.

Stage 2. The Turn around

*still looking at edits* “Yeah, I’ll fix it. This thing over here wasn’t clear, and this thing, why the crap do I keep saying that?”

Stage 3. The Dead Stop

*looks at project again* “OMG, did I send this out? To people? To read? This is horrible! Who said I could be a writer? What possessed me to think this was something I could do?”

Note: I wonder if this is where people just flat out stop? At this point, writing and fun no longer co-exist. There’s nothing but a huge gaping hole where the ego used to be. It’s very lonely at this stage.

Stage 4. Burgeoning Hope

*looks at project and edits side by side* “Hey, you know, if I do this, and then that and end with this, it might not be so bad. Let me try this.” *grabs something fun–  like scissors, colored index cards, a white board– and starts a new project*

Note: I think this is where writers fails at failing. It must get fixed– if possible. And in that crazy writer’s brain filled with voices and images of another world, it totally is possible.

Stage 5. Acceptance

“Okay, so maybe they were right about this and this. And this and this and this. Also, I seem to have an issue with commas, hyphens, and paragraphs which still make me question myself, but I can do this thing.”

 

To everyone out there editing a story, hats off to you! Know you’re not alone.

Also, have I mentioned that Great Minds Think Aloud is having a giveaway? Yes? Well, I’m mentioning it again. Enter using this contest form. Lots of free books to be had. There are other book giveaways going on as well, so be sure to check it out.